Discover the Dadant beehive

One of the most common beehives and most used by apiarists is the adjoining beehive. Known to users as simple and cheaper, it is the standard model in France. The frame beehive is not well known in the United States, which is mainly concerned with the Langstroth model. But in France, she is the pride of the apiarists that her inventor was successful with the American Land beehive at her time.

Discovering the Dadant beehive

One of the most common beehives and most used by apiarists is the adjoining beehive. Known to users as simple and cheaper, it is the standard model in France. The frame beehive is not well known in the United States, which is mainly concerned with the Langstroth model. But in France, she is the pride of the apiarists that her inventor was successful with the American Land beehive at her time.

The origins of the Dadant beehive

The name of the dadant beehive comes from its inventor Charles Dadant emerged on French lands and died on American soil. Several French apiarists recognize the merit of being the founder of modern apiculture. His first goal as an immigrant to the United States was to set up a winery there, but that did not happen and he turned to apiculture. He started selling honey and wax. His encounter with Paix de Beauvoys and his book marked the turning point of his life. And his passion for apiculture grew stronger after an interview with Moss Quinby. He and his son traveled the Mississippi selling honey and wax products such as candles, and he began to operate at the end of the civil war. He had 9 colonies from which he drew all these products. The adoring beehive was invented and gave the world of apiculture a new breath. It brought a wind of novelty and evolution.

The embed frame beehives were being left out to move more towards the movable frames ones. The yields were higher and the frames could be re-used after the extract. When he died, his son continued his work and headed the American Bee Journal, which his father bought at the end of the civil war and which still exists today.

Characteristics of the Dadant beehive

The Dadant beehive is made in a wooden box of pine or fir of about fifteen kilos. Its upper and lower part is made up of floorboards that are usually provided with a fence that protects bees from bee lice. The circulation of field bee bees is facilitated by the existence of the hive entrance. The adjoining beehive has 10 frames of dimensions 16,5 inch x 10,6 inch each with a thickness of 0,94 inch. The size of the beehive is 19,7 x 16,78 x 12,2 inch.

The beekeeper will harvest honey produced on the nine frames. A bottom board with a hole serves as a ceiling on the adjoining beehive to allow the apiarist to feed bees during the winter months. The hive cover is settled last on the whole system, as soon as it has the shape of a house roof and made of sheet metal. It will serve as a barrier to protecting the beehive against the weather and the vagaries of nature. Each element of the beehive overlaps but is interchangeable and can easily separate. A beehive produced up to 40 kg of honey for more than 60,000 worker bee bees.   

 

CANDITONUS